Candlestick chart

This chart shows the average performance loss implied by the importance ratings that managers in our survey gave to specific breakdowns in the planning and execution process.

The wick illustrates the highest and lowest traded prices of a security during the time interval represented. They are visually similar to box plots , though box plots show different information. Coppock curve Ulcer index. The peanut butter problem applies to CMOs as well.

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In other projects Wikimedia Commons. This page was last edited on 2 December , at By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. Wikimedia Commons has media related to Malanggan. This article about a tradition is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it. It is like a combination of line-chart and a bar-chart: The open, the close, the high and the low. Being densely packed with information, they tend to represent trading patterns over short periods of time, often a few days or a few trading sessions.

Candlestick charts are most often used in technical analysis of equity and currency price patterns. They are visually similar to box plots , though box plots show different information. Candlestick charts are thought to have been developed in the 18th century by Munehisa Homma , a Japanese rice trader of financial instruments.

They are often used today in stock analysis along with other analytical tools such as Fibonacci analysis Fibonacci retracement. In Beyond Candlesticks , [5] Nison says, "However, based on my research, it is unlikely that Homma used candle charts. As will be seen later, when I discuss the evolution of the candle charts, it was more likely that candle charts were developed in the early part of the Meiji period in Japan in the late s.

The area between the open and the close is called the real body , price excursions above and below the real body are shadows. The wick illustrates the highest and lowest traded prices of a security during the time interval represented. The body illustrates the opening and closing trades.

If the security closed higher than it opened, the body is hollow or unfilled, with the opening price at the bottom of the body and the closing price at the top. If the security closed lower than it opened, the body is solid or filled, with the opening price at the top and the closing price at the bottom. A black or red candle represents a price action with a lower closing price than the prior candle's close. A white or green candle represents a higher closing price than the prior candle's close.

Thus, the color of the candle represents the price movement relative to the prior period's close and the "fill" solid or hollow of the candle represents the price direction of the period in isolation solid for a higher open and lower close; hollow for a lower open and a higher close.

A candlestick need not have either a body or a wick. To better highlight price movements, modern candlestick charts especially those displayed digitally often replace the black or white of the candlestick body with colors such as red for a lower closing and blue or green for a higher closing. In addition to the rather simple patterns depicted in the section above, there are more complex and difficult patterns which have been identified since the charting method's inception.

Complex patterns can be colored or highlighted for better visualization. But the challenges it faced in the early s were formidable.

Heavily invested in telecommunications, Corning was hit hard by the bursting of the dot-corn bubble. Revenue dropped in half, profits turned into heavy losses, and the share price plummeted 99 percent from its peak in September to its low in October Coming produced an amazing turnaround by making five big moves over a year period, and leapt from the bottom to the top of the performance Power Curve. When presented a strategy plan, some CFOs can be tempted to play it safe by spreading resources across the whole business.

Our research found that companies are more likely to succeed when they reallocate capital expenditures at a healthy clip-feeding the units that could break out and produce a major move up the Power Curve, while starving those that are unlikely to surge.

The threshold here is reallocating at least 50 percent of capital expenditure among business units over a decade. Companies that shift more than 50 percent of their capital expenditure across business units over 10 years create 50 percent more value over that period than companies that move resources at a slower clip.

The peanut butter problem applies to CMOs as well. Knowing the odds of success and the attributes that lead to them will be invaluable in helping CMOs to more accurately evaluate the strategies presented to them. The wise CMO will make the case for focusing on the right priorities.